OPINION;  Court blind to corrupt judges

The Supreme Court of Justice is kidnapped by vested interests, which have nothing to do with the correct administration of disputes and litigation in Panama. Yesterday, for example, a plenary session dominated by alternate magistrates demonstrated how willing the country's top arbiters are to submit, on their knees, the legal logic and institutional framework. The foolish insistence on committing a legal nonsense, as is the declinatory of the competition, and the even more absurd declaration of nullity of what was done by the magistrate Jerónimo Mejía, reveals the perfidious intentions hidden among the togas of the Palacio Gil Ponce. The entire country is hostage to legal insecurity, in the hands of magistrates who are willing to leave honor, integrity, and reason for unknown reasons, but which generate a repugnant suspicion. If their collusion is successful, the story will be in charge of putting them in their proper place. Today, the country dawns uneasily because we already know that we have an illegitimate and cowardly Supreme Court. They could do a favor to their true boss, the nation, and make their positions available since doing justice is a task that is obviously alien to them. -LA PRENSA, Dec. 7

Although the Supreme Court of Justice is divided into four chambers -Penal, Civil, Contentious Administrative and General Business- its members act in a collegial manner, when they must decide business of a constitutional nature.

It is therefore inexplicable that there has not been a single questioning of two of those judges, accused of putting their judicial decisions on sale, one of them, none other than the interim president of the CSJ, and the other, through his son, fully identified in the corruptive activity. In the case of Judge Hernán De León, it is not the first time. Before he admitted to the prosecutor of the Nation that they had recorded him -who knows in what unspeakable matter- and that he was the object of blackmail to decline the competence of the process followed by Ricardo Martinelli. Now the rapporteur in a ruling on this same case – on which the whole process depends – is accused of selling his decisions to the highest bidder. Despite this, the other seven magistrates have said nothing. It does not even seem to mind the fact that he who sells his conscience once will do so for the rest of his life. What credibility can your decisions have, even if they are strictly legal? The reputation of both – and that of several of their colleagues in the CSJ – is irreparably tainted. One of the accused magistrates said that his honesty is not “in doubt.” That stage has passed. The evidence against him has cleared all doubt, giving way to the certainty of the non-existence of his alleged honesty. He does not even seem to mind the fact that he who sells his conscience once will do so for the rest of his life. What credibility can his decisions have, even if they are strictly legal? The reputation of both – and that of several of their colleagues in the CSJ – is irreparably tainted. One of the accused magistrates said that his honesty is not “in doubt.” That stage has passed. The evidence against him has cleared all doubt, giving way to the certainty of the non-existence of his alleged honesty. He does not even seem to mind the fact that he who sells his conscience once will do so for the rest of his life. What credibility can your decisions have, even if they are strictly legal? T-LA PRENSA, Nov. 17