Imported malaria detected in Herrera

 
859Views 5Comments Posted 12/08/2017

Health authorities in  Herrera  Province are stepping up epidemiological surveillance after detection of the first case of imported malaria.

The announcement came from  Jacqueline Solís, director of the Dr. Cecilio A Castillero de Chitré, Regional Hospital. She said that the case

is a 30-year-old male patient from Venezuela entered the country on July 31, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. and moved to the district of Chitré the same day. The patient is being held in the hospital and kept isolated.

She said that it was not until  August 8  that he went to the emergency room of the Regional Hospital with symptoms of fever, low back pain and general discomfort. After lab tests, he was diagnosed positive for Malaria by imported plasmodium vivax, the first recorded case in the province in 2017.

Plasmodium Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites transmitted to humans by the bite of mosquitoes belonging to the Genus Plasmodium species.   There is no presence of the species in the province.

Solís said that at the inspection by vector inspectors no hatcheries of mosquitoes of any species were found.



Comments 5

user
Wesley M Brown

Absolutely not! There is a big difference between sloppy or incorrect reporting and fake news. In this case the news source simply made a mistake and got the genus of the malarial mosquito wrong. This was a very minor error. Most readers probably wouldn't know Plasmodium from Anopheles - indeed, many still don't know that malaria is caused by a protozoon that infects Anopheles mosquitos and not by the mosquito's bite. If you are bitten by an uninfected Anopheles you don't get malaria.

2 years ago
user
mhogan

Are you claiming Panama has fake news outlets? Now that is something I never considered since I grew up in an era where you could trust what you read or heard on news channels. Still fall prey to news that isn't 'vetted' for accuracy. Thanks, this is an eye opener for what I read locally.

2 years ago
user
Wesley M Brown

I don't blame Panamá - insufficient vetting by the media is probably the cause of most of those. The Panamanian scientific and medical personnel with whom I interact and have interacted have been as astute and well-trained as their US counterparts. I don't know who vets what goes into Newsroom Panama and I haven't bothered to check the quoted (and often translated) original sources, so can't finger any culprit for sure. As for those who maker decisions (i.e., politicians), "más o menos" appears to be a worldwide trait.

2 years ago
user
mhogan

Does Panama have a "mas o menos" correct mentality? First the "snake" stiry and now mosquitos. And we're supposed to place our lives and trust in those who make decisions on issues of our health and safety. Doesn't give me a warm and fuzzy feeling.

2 years ago
user
Wesley M Brown

The mosquito genus is Anopheles, not Plasmodium. Plasmodium is the genus of the malaria-causing parasite that can infect Anopheles mosquitos and be transmitted by them.

2 years ago
The comments are the responsibility of each author who freely expresses his opinion and not that of Newsroom Panama.
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